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Imported From Detroit (project 1)

Page history last edited by marielle frattaroli 9 years, 5 months ago

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SKL254Y_jtc

 

First Project Intro Draft: "Imported From Detroit"

 

"You better lose yourself in the music, the moment, you own it, you better never let it go. You only get one shot, do not miss your chance to blow. This opportunity comes once in a lifetime." -Marshall Bruce Mathers, Lose Yourself. This isn't just a line from an offensive song, written by some disrespectful rapper who comes from a crappy run-down city. It is the soundtrack to one of the most revolutionary television advertisements ever made. Chrysler's XLV Superbowl commercial dosn't feature Detroit as a city full of crime and poverty, but of strength, hard work, sophistication, and luxury. 'Born of Fire' shows not only how great the car being advertised is, but also how great Detroit is, by the audio and visual effects, connecting with the audience's emotions, and using a celebrity that is well known around the world.

The images in this ad, along with the cleverly written text portrays something much larger than just trying to sell a car, it tells the story of a city, my city. The ad shows how a broken down city, being Detroit, can rebuild itself and become so powerful, which relates to plenty of times in our nation's history. For example, during The Great Depression, our country was in terrible shape. The economy fell, money was short and poverty was everywhere.  For a while, that's right where Detroit was headed.  Now, with Kilpatrick out of the picture and numerous organizations stepping in to help, Detroit is finally standing on it's own two feet again, just like the United States came back stronger than ever.

 

 

 

 

First Project Draft: Imported From Detroit

     "You better lose yourself in the music, the moment, you own it, you better never let it go. You only get one shot, do not miss your chance to blow. This opportunity comes once in a lifetime." -Marshall Bruce Mathers, Lose Yourself. This isn't just a line from an offensive song, written by some disrespectful rapper who comes from a crappy run-down city. It is the soundtrack to one of the most revolutionary television advertisements ever made. Chrysler's XLV Superbowl commercial doesn’t feature Detroit as a city full of crime and poverty, but of strength, hard work, sophistication, and luxury. 'Born of Fire' shows not only how great the car being advertised is, but also how great Detroit is, by the audio and visual effects, connecting with the audience's emotions, and using a celebrity that is well known around the world.

     The images in this ad, along with the cleverly written text portrays something much larger than just trying to sell a car, it tells the story of a city, my city. The ad shows how a broken down city, being Detroit, can rebuild itself and become so powerful, which relates to plenty of times in our nation's history. For example, during The Great Depression, our country was in terrible shape. The economy fell, money was short and poverty was everywhere.  For a while, that's right where Detroit was headed.  Now, with Kilpatrick out of the picture and numerous organizations stepping in to help, Detroit is finally standing on its own two feet again, just as the United States once did. 

     Chrysler’s ‘Born of Fire’ commercial, first aired during the 2011 XLV Superbowl, is one of a kind.  The very first shot is of a highway that all metro-Detroiters know exceptionally well; none other than I-75.  As the commercial begins to progress we hear the narrators voice, Kevin Yon, a voice-over artist from Rockford, Michigan. (Obviously keeping the Michigan theme going.)  He starts off by asking “What does this city (Detroit) know about luxury?   What does a town that’s been to hell and back know about the finer things in life?”  Believe it or not, Detroit knows more than most.

     Many people think Detroit is just a has-been.  They just sit down in the morning with their coffees, get their newspapers delivered to their doorsteps, and read all the crime stories coming from Detroit written by people who have never even step foot on Woodward or took a picture in front of Mr. Stanley.  “They don’t know what we’re capable of.” – Kevin Yon, Born of Fire.  Detroit is capable of so much.  

     The ad sells Detroit as a city full of hard work, strength, culture, and luxury.  As the narrator takes us from the highway to downtown, we pass factory after factory.  If you work in a factory, you’re going to have to work hard. There’s no way of getting around it.  As we head into downtown, there is a painting shown of men in old-fashioned clothes working in an old factory.  That’s what Detroit, hard work and it’s been built inside of us for generations. 

     As we move to the heart of downtown we see the famous ‘Fist of a Champion’ dedicated to Joe Louis.  The statue symbolizes that Detroiters have great strength, especially the great Joe Louis.  We also see a football team running in the cold winter temperatures Detroit has, which takes immense strength. 

     As we look around downtown, we see that Detroit has more culture than anyone could ever ask for.  The commercial shows many of Detroit’s most famous statues including ‘Fist of a Champion’, ‘Mr. Stanley’ and others.  We also see parts of old neighborhoods and their amazing architecture as well as the architecture of the skyscrapers of downtown, which are both very rich in culture.  Towards the end of the ad, we see Eminem driving the car being advertised, the Chrysler 200.  He ends up at the Fox Theatre, which is a huge cultural icon in Detroit.  He walks into the theatre, and there is a choir singing; just another point added to Detroit’s cultural score. 

      But what about Detroit’s luxury score?  A lot of people would probably laugh and say, “Isn’t that in the negatives?”  After seeing this ad, a lot of those people would probably change their answer.  ‘Born of Fire’ shows just how luxurious Detroit can be.  Heading into downtown, we see the skyline of Detroit, which, whatever city you’re looking at, is a luxurious site.  Walking around downtown, we see a gentleman wearing a top hat, a nice suede coat, and a suit and tie underneath.  Isn’t that what business men in luxurious places like New York wear?  Later in the commercial, the car is finally revealed. As it emerges from the darkness of the city, we admire the sleekness and sexiness of the 200.  A car made that luxurious must come from somewhere that luxurious.  The car, driving down Woodward, eventually ends up at the Fox Theatre.  The bright lights, huge theatre, and amazing architecture just screams luxury.           

      Besides selling Detroit with things made or from Detroit, the commercial also uses ‘other special effects.’  One of the big concepts of this ad is the narration.  The text is written so well and so clever, that you can help but have a little bit of Detroit pride, even if you’re an Avalanche fan.  The song that was playing in the background only adds to the effect of feeling that Detroit pride.  The song playing is ‘Lose Yourself’ by Eminem, who, un-coincidentally, was born and raised in Detroit.  Most everybody knows that’s; he only references Detroit in all of his songs.  When the guitar riff is added to the narration about half way through the ad, you can feel the intensity building.  The intensity builds even further yet.  As Em gets closer to the Fox, a choir starts singing chords to match the guitar riff.  This music at this point in the commercial makes things very dramatic and catches the audience’s attention right before the big finish.  The cinematography is also used very well in this ad.  The audience only see’s one thing at a time, for example the I-75 sign or Mr. Stanley.  This is such a simple concept but says so much for the city of Detroit at the same time.  The cinematography even makes the car look better.  By playing with the light and where the camera is positioned, they can make the car look like it is coming out of pure darkness which makes it look very sleek and powerful. 

 

 

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